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2018
Volume 57, Issue 4
  • ISSN: 0034-527X
  • E-ISSN: 1943-2348
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Abstract

How do Latina/Chicana girls use writing and art to describe their experiences, histories, and identities? What can we learn from their voices?

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2023-05-01
2024-03-01
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