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2018
Volume 35, Issue 4
  • ISSN: 0034-527X
  • E-ISSN: 1943-2348

Abstract

Four case studies of proficient undergraduate writers from working-class backgrounds were conducted in the context of a course preparing sophomore and junior students to be tutors for first-year basic writers. It was found that, in contrast to much of the theorizing by and about working-class academics that emphasizes loss, a stronger theme in these students’ narratives of growing academic literacy was gaming. Students explained their experiences in ways that suggested a greater degree of agency, an awareness of themselves as writers in a contact zone, and a stance of tricking teachers on the way to producing acceptable texts. These findings suggest that writing in the contact zone of the classroom may require a double-voicedness that need not always be heard by instructors but is nevertheless important to students.

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/content/journals/10.58680/rte20011730
2001-05-01
2024-07-21
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http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.58680/rte20011730
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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