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2018
Volume 101, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 0360-9170
  • E-ISSN: 1943-2402

Abstract

This article examines three interrelated aspects concerning reader access, development, and engagement with Black children’s literature—educational policies and surveillance of Black children’s literature, publishing trends, and Black youths’ reader response—to consider what these elements tell us about where the field of Black children’s literature might go from here.

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/content/journals/10.58680/la202332597
2023-09-01
2024-05-21
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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