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2018
Volume 99, Issue 5
  • ISSN: 0360-9170
  • E-ISSN: 1943-2402

Abstract

Using book clubs as a mirror, this article shares how one teacher inquiry group disrupted and transformed their thinking about student writing groups.

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/content/journals/10.58680/la202231793
2022-05-01
2024-04-24
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References

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  • Article Type: Research Article
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