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2018
Volume 99, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 0360-9170
  • E-ISSN: 1943-2402

Abstract

This study presents ways elementary teachers can use a science picturebook genre as an avenue into a grammatical structure prevalent within school science books.

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/content/journals/10.58680/la202131517
2021-11-01
2024-02-28
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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