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2018
Volume 98, Issue 5
  • ISSN: 0360-9170
  • E-ISSN: 1943-2402

Abstract

This overview of picturebook studies published in English (2010-2020) includes fundamental findings for teaching and supporting readers as well as potential new research directions.

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2021-05-01
2024-04-16
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