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2018
Volume 97, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 0360-9170
  • E-ISSN: 1943-2402

Abstract

The authors review the field of family literacy and describe promising practices to support the work educators do with families.

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/content/journals/10.58680/la201930235
2019-09-01
2024-02-23
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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