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2018
Volume 96, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 0360-9170
  • E-ISSN: 1943-2402

Abstract

This qualitative study describes the ways that first-grade children make meaning with wordless picturebooks through play as reader response.

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/content/journals/10.58680/la201829747
2018-09-01
2024-02-28
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