Skip to content
2018
Volume 95, Issue 5
  • ISSN: 0360-9170
  • E-ISSN: 1943-2402

Abstract

Using multimodal perspectives, this article examines how the double-page spread layout of an informational book allows readers to make meaning, just as if they are navigating hypertexts.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.58680/la201829585
2018-05-01
2024-04-13
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

  1. Bezemer JKress G. (2010) Changing text: A social semiotic analysis of textbooks. Designs for Learning, 3(1–2, 10–29.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Cart M (2002) Carte blanche: Eyewitness books: Putting the graphic in lexigraphic. Booklist, 99, 399–413.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Dresang E. T. (1999) Radical change: Books for youth in a digital age. New York, NY, Wilson.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Dresang E. T. (2008) Radical change revisited: Dynamic digital age books for youth. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 8, 294–304.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Duke N. K (2000) 3.6 minutes per day: The scarcity of informational texts in first grade. Reading Research Quarterly, 35, 202–224.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Duke N. K.Kays J. (1998) “Can I say, ‘Once upon a time’?”: Kindergarten children developing knowledge of information book language. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 13, 295–318.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Halliday MK A. (1985) An introduction to functional grammar. London, UK, Edward Arnold.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Hodge RKress G. (1988) Social semiotics. Ithaca, NY, Cornell University Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Jewitt C (2005) Multimodality, “reading,” and “writing” for the 21st century. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, 26, 315–331.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Jewitt C (2008) Multimodality and literacy in school classrooms. Review of Research in Education, 32, 241–267.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Kerper R. M (2001) Nonfiction book design in a digital age. InZarnowski M.Kerper R. M.Jensen J. M.Eds The best in children’s nonfiction: Reading, writing, & teaching Orbis Pictus Award books. 22–31. Urbana, IL, National Council of Teachers of English.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Kress G (2010) Multimodality: A social semiotic approach to contemporary communication. New York, NY, Routledge.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Kress Gvan Leeuwen T. (1996) Reading images: The grammar of visual design. New York, NY, Routledge.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Lemke J (1998) Multiplying meaning: Visual and verbal semiotics in scientific text. InMartin J. R.Veal R.Eds Reading science: Critical and functional perspectives on discourses of science. 87–114. New York, NY, Routledge.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Lemke J. L (2001) Discursive technologies and the social organization of meaning. Folia Linguistica, 35, 79–96.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Lemke J. L (2002) Travels in hypermodality. Visual Communication, 1, 299–235.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Leslie LCaldwell J. S. (2011) Qualitative reading inventory. 5th ed. Boston, MA, Pearson.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Moss G (2001) To work or play? Junior age nonfiction as objects of design. Reading, 35(3, 106–110.
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Moss GMcDonald J. W. (2004) The borrowers: Library records as unobtrusive measures of children’s reading preferences. Journal of Research in Reading, 27, 401–412.
    [Google Scholar]
  20. National Governors Association Center for Best Practices & Council of Chief State School Officers (2010) Common core state standards for English language arts and literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects. Washington, DC Author Retrieved from http://www.corestandards.org/ela-literacy.
    [Google Scholar]
  21. National Research Council 2013) Next generation science standards: For states, by states. Washington, DC, The National Academies Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Pappas C. C (1993) Is narrative “primary”? Some insights from kindergarteners’ pretend readings of stories and information books. Journal of Reading Behavior, 25, 97–129.
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Roberts K. L.Norman R. R.Duke N. K.Morsink P.Martin N. M.Knight J. A. (2013) Diagrams, timelines, and tables— Oh, my! Fostering graphical literacy. The Reading Teacher, 67, 12–24.
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Serafni F (2014) Reading the visual: An introduction to teaching multimodal literacy. New York, NY, Teachers College Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Serafni FClausen J. (2012) Typography as semiotic resource. Journal of Visual Literacy, 31(2, 1–16.
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Tower C (2002) “It’s a snake, you guys!”: The power of text characteristics on children’s responses to information books. Research in the Teaching of English, 37, 55–88.
    [Google Scholar]
  27. van Leeuwen T. (2005) Introducing social semiotics. New York, NY, Routledge.
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Awdry W (2005) Thomas the tank engine: Story collection. New York, NY, Random House Books.
    [Google Scholar]
  29. DK Eyewitness Books. 1998) Dorling Kindersley Publishing. London, United Kingdom.
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Jenkins I (2000) The explorer’s book of dinosaurs. Chesterman A., Illus. Princeton, NJ, Two-Can Publishing.
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Ryan D (2008) My first encyclopedia of dinosaurs. Sydney, Australia, Fog City Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Time-Life Education Editors (1995) A child’s first library of learning encyclopedia set, 1–11, New York, NY, Time-Life.
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.58680/la201829585
Loading
/content/journals/10.58680/la201829585
Loading

Data & Media loading...

  • Article Type: Research Article
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error