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2018
Volume 95, Issue 4
  • ISSN: 0360-9170
  • E-ISSN: 1943-2402
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Abstract

This article examines the poetry writing practices of two teen girls through a world making lens—a writing approachthat critically centers youth experiences and identities.

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/content/journals/10.58680/la201829525
2018-03-01
2024-04-13
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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