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2018
Volume 113, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 0013-8274
  • E-ISSN: 2161-8895

Abstract

This article offers a unique approach to teaching critical media literacy by examining the rhetorical influence of conspiracy theories as a tool to counter mis- and disinformation.

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/content/journals/10.58680/ej202332738
2023-11-01
2024-03-03
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References

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  • Article Type: Research Article
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