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2018
Volume 55, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 0007-8204
  • E-ISSN: 1943-2216

Abstract

In this article, I consider how pre- and inservice educators notice texts they enjoy in their daily lived experiences and how this positioning may support an attention to equity-oriented English education. I focus on texts that educators working in professional roles, ranging from literacy coaches to elementary and secondary ELA teachers to administrators, notice in their daily experiences. Drawing on a curricular assignment in a writing pedagogy course, I consider how educators relate the texts they find interesting to their own understanding of equity-oriented writing instruction. I examine for how teachers consider the texts of their lives and how such attentiveness might help them build humanizing, equity-oriented curriculum with and for students. I also seek to disrupt the overwhelming emphasis on writing as what is needed to pass a standardized assessment. This alignment toward enjoyment may support English educators as they, in turn, support and view students and their languages and literacies as worthy and brilliant.

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2023-01-01
2024-03-01
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