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2018
Volume 53, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 0007-8204
  • E-ISSN: 1943-2216

Abstract

: This study was supported in part with funds from the Conference on English Education (CEE/ELATE) Research Initiative grant.

Among the expectations placed on English teacher educators is the need to prepare preservice teachers to actively develop as professionals. Teachers are increasingly turning to involvement in participatory online professional development (POPD) opportunities for their own development. Subsequently, this article presents research from a qualitative study investigating how selected English teacher educators prepare preservice teachers to engage in POPD activities. Drawing on interview transcripts, instructional materials, and online artifacts, research findings address teacher educators’ instructional goals when facilitating POPD activities and the instructional methods they employed to support preservice teachers’ engagement in POPD activities.

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/content/journals/10.58680/ee202030906
2020-10-01
2024-02-23
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