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2018
Volume 52, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0007-8204
  • E-ISSN: 1943-2216

Abstract

In this article, we examine fugitivity and fugitive literacies as they are enacted by youth—young people who cross and experience life on both sides of the border between Mexico and the United States. Through a community-based literacy project located on the border between El Paso, Texas, USA, and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, this article focuses on storytelling and multimodal creation, what we refer to as multimodal cuentos. Findings illustrate the ways in which Chicanx/Latinx youth exhibit, build, and sustain their ways of resisting white, Western, hegemonic definitions of literacy through communication and creativity. We theorize the notion of fugitivity on the border and share potential implications for language and literacy education for Chicanx/Latinx border crossers.

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/content/journals/10.58680/ee202030597
2020-04-01
2024-04-13
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