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2018
Volume 52, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0007-8204
  • E-ISSN: 1943-2216
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Abstract

This article details a self-study dissecting an interracial group of students’ theories of Blackness in a postsecondary classroom. I begin by conceptualizing as tools with which to awaken and animate education as the practice of liberation from whiteness and anti-Blackness. I then approach multimodal essay composition as one such practice and illuminate its application in a classroom. I show how this practice affirmed students as empowered producers of knowledge. I contend that pedagogues must pivot away from the of whiteness and anti-Blackness as a defined target, and turn toward the of both as a desirable goal. I conclude by considering further inquiries that this provocation invites vis-à-vis curriculum and pedagogy in English teacher education.

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2020-04-01
2024-04-19
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