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2018
Volume 52, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 0007-8204
  • E-ISSN: 1943-2216

Abstract

Recent decades show increased scholarship in literacy education considering LGBTQ-themed texts and LGBTQ people in English language arts classrooms. Building on studies exploring choice in school-based reading, I focus on the experiences of youth navigating their visibility when they interacted with other people about their queer reading choices in the context of required independent reading for their ELA course. I examine how varying configurations of literacy sponsorship affected students’ actions. The findings help illuminate the complex relationships among LGBTQ-inclusive curricula and youth experiences.

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/content/journals/10.58680/ee201930313
2019-10-01
2024-02-23
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