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2018
Volume 51, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 0007-8204
  • E-ISSN: 1943-2216
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Abstract

This article focuses on Mr. Kurt, a white, first-year English teacher in an all-white context who has chosen to teach his students about whiteness, white supremacy, white privilege, and the many ways institutionalized racism is enacted in daily life. I center this article on classroom scenarios that highlight the challenges embedded in dealing with race and whiteness in curriculum and classroom discussion. I conclude with a discussion of how possibilities for antiracist and social justice pedagogies in English education rely on the field’s willingness to embrace a more nuanced conversation, and I offer implications for classroom practice at the K–12 and teacher education levels.

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2019-01-01
2024-02-23
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