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2018
Volume 50, Issue 4
  • ISSN: 0007-8204
  • E-ISSN: 1943-2216

Abstract

Among the lessons that emerged after the recent presidential election is a recognition that teachers are generally not prepared to address the intersections of healing, politics, and emotion in classrooms. Now, more than ever, English educators must address trauma in classrooms, while also recognizing how individuals and groups are positioned differently in the material and emotional stakes of this election. Drawing on research, the voices of teachers, and our experiences over this past year, we call for more expansive conversations among English educators across perspectives concerned with creating safe, relational, anti-oppressive classrooms.

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/content/journals/10.58680/ee201829735
2018-07-01
2024-04-18
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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