Skip to content
2018
Volume 50, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 0007-8204
  • E-ISSN: 1943-2216

Abstract

In this article, we describe the promise of professional development for teachers by considering the following questions: (1) What do teachers who work in urban public schools see as the intended purposes of professional development, and what do they identify as their needs? (2) Can a move from professional development as absent of what teachers say they need to professional development as publicly engaged scholarship center justice, equity, and humanization in teaching and learning? To address these questions, we analyze qualitative data from preK–12 teachers, teacher educators, and education support professionals who participated in a professional development initiative in an urban school district in the U.S. Midwest.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.58680/ee201829440
2018-01-01
2024-02-23
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

  1. Amatea E. Cholewa B. Mixon K. (2012) Influencing preservice teachers’ attitudes about working with low-income and/or ethnic minority families. Urban Education, 47(4), 801–834.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Anderson L. Olsen B. (2006) Investigating teachers’ perspectives on and experiences in early career professional development. Journal of Teacher Education, 57(4), 359–377.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Banks C. A. M. Banks J. A. (1995) Equity pedagogy: An essential component of multicultural education. Theory into Practice, 34(3), 152–158.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Bartolome L. I. (1994) Beyond the methods fetish: Toward a humanizing pedagogy. Harvard Educational Review, 64(2), 173–194.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Borko H. (2004) Professional development and teacher learning: Mapping the terrain. Educational Researcher, 33(8), 3–15.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Cammarota J. Romero A. (2011) Participatory action research for high school students: Transforming policy, practice, and the personal with social justice education. Educational Policy, 25(3), 488–506.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Carr W. Kemmis S. (1986) Becoming critical: Education, knowledge and action research. London: Falmer Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Carspecken P. F. (1996) Critical ethnography in educational research. A theoretical and practical guide. New York: Routledge.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Catapano S. (2005) Teacher professional development through children’s project work. Early Childhood Education Journal, 32(4), 261–267.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Cochran-Smith M. (2004) Walking the road: Race, diversity, and social justice in teacher education. New York: Teachers College Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Creswell J. W. Maietta R. C. (2002) Qualitative research. InMiller D. C. Salkind N. J. (Eds.), Handbook of research design and social measurement. (6th ed., pp.143–184). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Duncan-Andrade J. M. Morrell E. (2008) Youth participatory action research as critical pedagogy. Counterpoints (The art of critical pedagogy: Possibilities for Moving from Theory to Practice in Urban Schools), 285, 105–131.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Foster M. (2004) An innovative professional development program for urban teachers. Phi Delta Kappan, 85(5), 401–406.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Freire P. (1970a) Cultural action for freedom. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Review.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Freire P. (1970b) Pedagogy of the Oppressed. New York: Continuum.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Freire P. (1998) Pedagogy of freedom: Ethics, democracy, and civic courage. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Geertz C. (1973) The interpretation of cultures: Selected essays. New York: Basic Books.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Giroux H. (2004) Cultural studies, public pedagogy, and the responsibility of intellectuals. Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies, 1(1), 59–79.
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Goldenberg B. M. (2014) White teachers in urban classrooms: Embracing non-White students’ cultural capital for better teaching and learning. Urban Education, 49(1), 111–144.
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Habermas J. (1971) Toward a rational society. Trans. Jeremy J. Shapiro. London: Heinemann.
    [Google Scholar]
  21. hooks b. (1994) Teaching to transgress: Education as the practice of freedom. New York: Routledge.
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Johnson C. C. Marx S. (2009) Transformative professional development: A model for urban science education reform. Journal of Science Teacher Education, 20(2), 113–134.
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Kinloch V. (2015) Critically conscious teaching and instructional leadership as Projects in Humanization (PiH). Educational Studies, 4(3), 29–35.
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Kinloch V. San Pedro T. (2014) The space between listening and storying: Foundations for Projects in Humanization. InParis D. Winn M. T. (Eds.), Humanizing research: Decolonizing qualitative inquiry with youth and communities (pp.21–42). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Ladson-Billings G. (1998) Just what is critical race theory and what’s it doing in a nice field like education?Qualitative Studies in Education, 11(1), 7–24.
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Lum B. C. Jacob M. M. (2012) University-community engagement, axes of difference & dismantling race, gender, and class oppression. Race, Gender & Class, 19(3/4), 309–324.
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Madison S. D. (2012) Critical ethnography: Method, ethics, and performance. (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Matias C. E. (2013) On the “flip” side: A teacher educator of color unveiling the dangerous minds of white teacher candidates. Teacher Education Quarterly, 40(2), 53–73.
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Matias C. E. Liou D. D. (2015) Tending to the heart of communities of color: Towards critical race teacher activism. Urban Education, 50(5), 601–625.
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Mills G. E. (2003) Action research: A guide for the teacher researcher. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice Hall.
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Moll L. C. Amanti C. Neff D. González N. (1992) Funds of knowledge for teaching: Using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classrooms. Theory into Practice, 31(2), 132–141.
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Murrell P. C. Jr. 2001) The community teacher: A new framework for effective urban teaching. New York: Teachers College Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Noel J. (2016) Community-based urban teacher education: Theoretical frameworks and practical considerations for developing promising practices. The Teacher Educator, 51, 335–350.
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Noguera P. A. (2008) The trouble with black boys … And other reflections on race, equity, and the future of public education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
    [Google Scholar]
  35. O’Meara K. Rice R. E. (Eds.) (2005) Faculty priorities reconsidered: Encouraging multiple forms of scholarship. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Ozanne J. L. Saatcioglu B. (2008) Participatory action research. Journal of Consumer Research, 35(3), 423–439.
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Paris D. (2012) Culturally sustaining pedagogy: A needed change in stance, terminology, and practice. Educational Researcher, 41(3), 93–97.
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Paris D. Alim H. S. (2014) What are we seeking to sustain through culturally sustaining pedagogy?: A loving critique forward. Harvard Educational Review, 84(1), 85–100.
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Razfar A. (2011) Action research in urban schools: Empowerment, transformation, and challenges. Teacher Education Quarterly, 38(4), 25–44.
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Stovall D. (2006) Forging community in race and class: Critical race theory and the quest for social justice in education. Race, Ethnicity and Education, 9(3), 243–259.
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Upton J. (2013) Annual evaluation report for “Bringing learning to life: Service learning for educators at all levels.”. Columbus: Unpublished document.
    [Google Scholar]
  42. U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (2013) Digest of education statistics. Retrieved fromhttps://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d13/tables/dt13_209.10asp
    [Google Scholar]
  43. Wilson-Cooper C. (2006) Refining social justice commitments through collaborative inquiry: Key rewards and challenges for teacher educators. Teacher Education Quarterly, 33(3), 115–132.
    [Google Scholar]
  44. Yoon I. H. (2012) The paradoxical nature of whiteness-at-work in the daily life of schools and teacher communities. Race, Ethnicity and Education, 15, 587–613.
    [Google Scholar]
  45. Yost D. S. Vogel R. (2007) Urban professional development: Working to create successful teachers and achieving students. Middle School Journal, 38(3), 34–40.
    [Google Scholar]
  46. Young E. Y. (2011) The four personae of racism: Educators’ (mis)understanding of individual vs. systemic racism. Urban Education, 46(6), 1433–1460.
    [Google Scholar]
  47. Zygmunt E. Clark P. with Clausen J. Mucherah W. Tancock S. (2015) Transforming teacher education for social justice. New York: Teachers College Press.
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.58680/ee201829440
Loading
/content/journals/10.58680/ee201829440
Loading

Data & Media loading...

  • Article Type: Research Article
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error