Skip to content
2018
Volume 84, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 0010-0994
  • E-ISSN: 2161-8178
side by side viewer icon HTML
Preview this article:

There is no abstract available.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.58680/ce202131450
2021-09-01
2024-02-28
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/ce/84/1/collegeenglish31450.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.58680/ce202131450&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Acosta Abraham. “The Coloniality of Power, Reoriginalization, and the Critique of Imperialism.” FORMA, vol.1, no. 1 2019 , pp.17–36.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Alcoff Linda. “An Epistemology for the Next Revolution.” Transmodernity, vol.1, no. 1 2011 , pp.67–78.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Anzaldúa Gloria. Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza. 1987.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Baca Damián Cushman Ellen Osborn Jonathan editors Landmark Essays on Rhetorics of Difference Routledge2018.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Baca Damián Villanueva Victor editors Rhetorics of the Americas: 3114 BCE to 2012 CE 1st ed., Palgrave Macmillan2010.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Bhabha Homi K.. The Location of Culture Routledge2012.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Browne Kevin Adonis. “A Douen Epistemology: Caribbean Memory and the Digital Archive.” College English, vol.84, no. 1 2021 , pp.33–57.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Bruner Jerome. “Self-Making and World-Making.” Journal of Aesthetic Education, vol.25, no. 1 1991 67 DOI.org (Crossref), 10.2307/3333092.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Cintrón Ralph Corcoran Casey Bleeden David. “Thinking with/Not with Theories of Decolonization.” College English, vol.84, no. 1 2021 , pp.138–58.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Cobos Casie. et al. “Interfacing Cultural Rhetorics: A History and a Call.”, Rhetoric Review, vol.37, no. 2 Routledge.Apr 2018 , pp.139–54. 10.1080/07350198.2018.1424470.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Committee on Publication Ethics “Editor and Reviewers Requiring Authors to Cite Their Own Work.” Cases on Publication Ethics: Case Number 18-03.Editor and reviewers requiring authors to cite their own work. Accessed 24 May 2021.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Cortez José García Romeo. “The Absolute Limit of Latinx Writing.” CCC, vol.71, no. 4 2020 , pp.566–90.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Cushman Ellen. The Cherokee Syllabary: Writing the People’s Perseverance U of Oklahoma P2011.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Cushman Ellen. et al. “Decolonizing Projects: Creating Pluriversal Possibilities in Rhetoric.”, Rhetoric Review, vol.38, no. 1 Taylor & Francis2019 , pp.1–22.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Cushman Ellen. “Translingual and Decolonial Approaches to Meaning Making.” College English, vol.78, no. 3 2016 , pp.234–42.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Cushman Ellen. “Wampum, Sequoyan, and Story: Decolonizing the Digital Archive.” College English, vol.76, no. 2 2013 , pp.115–35.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Duffy John. Writing from These Roots Literacy in a Hmong-American Community U of Hawaii P2007.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Dussel Enrique. The Invention of the Americas. Eclipse of “the Other” and the Myth of Modernity 1997.
    [Google Scholar]
  19. “Editor and Reviewers Requiring Authors to Cite Their Own Work.” COPE: Committee on Publication Ethics 2018 publicationethics.org/case/editor-and-reviewers-requiring-authors-citetheir-own-work.
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Enoch Jessica Gold David. “Introduction: Seizing the Methodological Moment: The Digital Humanities and Historiography in Rhetoric and Composition.” College English, vol.76, no. 2 2013 , pp.105–14.
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Espina Tabitha. “Ali’e and Asi’i: Unsettling the Rhetorics of Filipinos on Guâhan.” College English, vol.84, no. 1 2021 , pp.100–120.
    [Google Scholar]
  22. García Romeo Baca Damián editors Rhetorics Elsewhere and Otherwise: Contested Modernities, Decolonial Visions National Council of Teachers of English2019.
    [Google Scholar]
  23. García Romeo Cortez José. “The Trace of a Mark that Scatters: The Anthropoi and the Rhetoric of Decoloniality.” Rhetoric Society Quarterly, vol.50, no. 2 2020 , pp.93–108.
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Gold David Hobbs Catherine editors Rhetoric, History, and Women’s Oratorical Education: American Women Learn to Speak Routledge2013.
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Hidalgo Alexandra. et al. Constellating Stories and Counterstories: Cultural Rhetorics Scholarship Principles Edited by Wieser Kimberly. no. 4 May 2021 http://constell8cr.com/conversations/cultural-rhetorics-scholarship/.
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Jackson Rachel C.. “Locating Oklahoma: Critical Regionalism and Transrhetorical Analysis in the Composition Classroom.” College Composition and Communication, vol.66, no. 2 2014 , pp.301–26.
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Jackson Rachel C.. “Red Flags of Dissent: Decoloniality, Transrhetoricity, and Local Differences of Race.” College English, vol.84, no. 1 2021 , pp.78–99.
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Jackson RAchél C.. “Resisting Relocation: Placing Leadership on Decolonized Indigenous Landscapes.” College English, vol.79, no. 5 2017 , pp.495–511.
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Jackson Rachel C. Whitehorse DeLaune Dorothy. “Decolonizing Community Writing with Community Listening: Story, Transrhetorical Resistance, and Indigenous Cultural Literacy Activism.” Community Literacy Journal, vol.13, no. 1 2018 , pp.37–54. DOI.org (Crossref) 10.1353/clj.2018.0020.
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Jones Cherice Escobar Barco Medina Genesis. “Teaching Racial Literacy through Language, Health, and the Body: Introducing Bio-racial Rhetorics in the Writing Classroom.” College English, vol.84, no. 1 2021 , pp.58–77.
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Karttunen Frances E.. An Analytical Dictionary of Nahuatl University of Oklahoma Press1992.
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Lathan Rhea Estelle. Freedom Writing: African American Civil Rights Literacy Activism, 1955–1967 National Council of Teachers of English2015.
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Lisa Michelle King. “Revisiting Winnetou: The Karl May Museum, Cultural Appropriation, and Indigenous Self-Representation.”, Studies in American Indian Literatures, vol.28, no. 2 University of Nebraska Press2016 , pp.25–55. 10.5250/studamerindilite.28.2.0025 JSTOR.
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Lugones María. Pilgrimages/Peregrinajes: Theorizing Coalition against Multiple Oppressions Rowman & Littlefield Publishers2003.
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Mignolo Walter D.. “Coloniality Is Far from Over, and So Must Be Decoloniality.” Afterall: A Journal of Art, Context and Enquiry, vol.43 Mar 2017 , pp.38–45. 10.1086/692552.
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Mignolo Walter D.. The Darker Side of Western Modernity: Global Futures, Decolonial Options Duke UP2011.
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Mignolo Walter D.. “Delinking.”, Cultural Studies, vol.21, no. 2-3 Routledge.Mar 2007 , pp.449–514. 10.1080/09502380601162647.
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Mignolo Walter D.. “Geopolitics of Sensing and Knowing: On (de)Coloniality, Border Thinking, and Epistemic Disobedience.” Confero Essays on Education Philosophy and Politics, vol.1, no. 1 Mar 2013 , pp.129–50. DOI.org (Crossref) 10.3384/confero.2001‑4562.13v1i1129.
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Moreiras Alberto. The Exhaustion of Difference: The Politics of Latin American Cultural Studies Duke UP2001.
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Moss Beverly. “Phenomenal Women,” Collaborative Literacies, and Community Texts in Alternative “Sista” Spaces, vol.1, no. 5 2010 , pp.1–24.
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Pandey Iswari P.. South Asian in the Mid-South: Migrations of Literacies U of Pittsburgh P2015.
    [Google Scholar]
  42. Powell Malea. et al. “Our Story Begins Here: Constellating Cultural Rhetorics.” Enculturation: A Journal of Rhetoric, Writing, and Culture, vol.25 2014.
    [Google Scholar]
  43. Powell Malea. “Rhetorics of Survivance: How American Indians Use Writing.” College Composition and Communication JSTOR 2002 , pp.396–434.
    [Google Scholar]
  44. Powell Malea Bratta Phil. “Entering the Cultural Rhetorics Conversations.” Enculturation: A Journal of Rhetoric, Writing, and Culture 2016.
    [Google Scholar]
  45. Pritchard Eric Darnell. Fashioning Lives: Black Queers and the Politics of Literacy Southern Illinois University Press2017.
    [Google Scholar]
  46. Proszak Laura. “Products of US Performance: A Material Rhetorical Education at North Bennet Street Industrial School, 1890–1910.”, Rhetoric Society Quarterly, vol.51, no. 2 Routledge.Mar 2021 , pp.109–21. 10.1080/02773945.2021.18778O1.
    [Google Scholar]
  47. Quijano Anibal. “Colonialidad y Modernidad/Racionalidad.” Peru Indig, vol.13, no. 29 1992 , pp.11–20.
    [Google Scholar]
  48. Quijano Aníbal Wallerstein Immanuel. “‘Americanity as a ‘Concept, or the Americas in the Modern World.” International Social Science Journal, vol.44, no. 4 1992 , pp.549–57.
    [Google Scholar]
  49. Ramírez Cristina. “Rhetorical Herencia : Writing Toward a Theory of Rhetorical Recovery and Transformation.” Latinx Writing and Rhetoric Studies, vol.1, no. 1 June 2020 , pp.161–78.
    [Google Scholar]
  50. Ratcliffe Krista. Rhetorical Listening: Identification, Gender, Whiteness SIU P2005.
    [Google Scholar]
  51. Rawson K. J.. “The Rhetorical Power of Archival Description: Classifying Images of Gender Transgression.”, Rhetoric Society Quarterly, vol.48, no. 4 ABINGDON Routledge2018 , pp.327–51. 10.1080/02773945.2017.1347951.
    [Google Scholar]
  52. Richardson Elaine. African American Literacies 0 ed Routledge2003 DOI.org (Crossref) 10.4324/9780203166550.
    [Google Scholar]
  53. Ruiz Iris D. Sánchez Raúl. Decolonizing Rhetoric and Composition Studies: New Latinx Keywords for Theory and Pedagogy Springer2016.
    [Google Scholar]
  54. Serviss Tricia C.. “Femicide and Rhetorics of Coadyuvante in Ciudad Juárez: Valuing Rhetorical Traditions in the Americas.” College English, vol.75, no. 6 2013 , pp.608–28.
    [Google Scholar]
  55. Spivak Gayatri Chakravorty. “Can the Subaltern Speak?” Die Philosophin, vol.14, no. 27 2003 , pp.42–58.
    [Google Scholar]
  56. Tlostanova Madina Mignolo Walter D.. Learning to Unlearn: Decolonial Reflections from Eurasia and the Americas Ohio State UP2012.
    [Google Scholar]
  57. Vieira Kate. “‘American by Paper’: Assimilation and Documentation in a Biliterate, Bi-Ethnic Immigrant Community.” College English, vol.73, no. 1 2010 , pp.50–72.
    [Google Scholar]
  58. Vieira Kate. “Writing Remittances: Migration-Driven Literacy Learning in a Brazilian Homeland.” Research in the Teaching of English, vol.50, no. 4 2016 , pp.422–49.
    [Google Scholar]
  59. Villanueva Victor. “‘Memoria’ Is a Friend of Ours: On the Discourse of Color.” College English, vol.67, no. 1 2004 , pp.9–19. 10.2307/4140722.
    [Google Scholar]
  60. Walsh Catherine. Interculturalidad, Estado, Sociedad Quito2009.
    [Google Scholar]
  61. Writing Studies Tree. (n.d.) writingstudiestree.org/.
    [Google Scholar]
  62. Zhang-Wu Qianqian. “Chinese International Students’ Experiences in American Higher Education Institutes: A Critical Review of the Literature.” Journal of International Students, vol.8, no. 2 Apr 2018 , pp.1173–97. DOI.org (Crossref) 10.32674/jis.v8i2.139.
    [Google Scholar]
  63. Zhang-Wu Qianqian. Languaging Myths and Realities: Journeys of Chinese International Students Multilingual Matters2021.
    [Google Scholar]
  64. Zhang-Wu Qianqian. “Preparing Monolingual Teachers of Multilingual Students: Strategies That Work.”, Language Learning in Anglophone Countries: Challenges, Practices, Ways Forward edited by Lanvers Ursula. et al. Springer International Publishing2021 , pp.463–84. 10.1007/978‑3‑030‑56654‑8_23.
    [Google Scholar]
  65. Zhang-Wu Qianqian. “(Re)Imagining Translingualism as a Verb to Tear Down the English-Only Wall: ‘Monolingual’ Students as Multilingual Writers.” College English, vol.84, no. 1 2021 , pp.121–37.
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.58680/ce202131450
Loading
  • Article Type: Research Article
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error