Skip to content
2018
Volume 75, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0010-096X
  • E-ISSN: 1939-9006

Abstract

Initiating a transdisciplinary composition stretch pedagogy, I examine students’ excavations of archives to advance epistemological freedoms in support of rhetorical sovereignty in student writings. Grounded in Latinx studies first-year composition, I analyze archival projects wherein Chicanx students seek rhetorical inheritances, questing to locate textual homes and emotions of belonging.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.58680/ccc2024753483
2024-02-01
2024-06-25
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

  1. Alexander Jonathan, and Rhodes Jacqueline. “Queer Rhetoric and the Pleasures of the Archive.” Enculturation, no. 13 2012, https://www.enculturation.net/queer-rhetoric-and-the-pleasures-of-the-archive.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Alvarez Steven. “Rhetorical Autoethnography: Delinking English Language Learning in a Family Oral History.” Rhetorics Elsewhere and Otherwise: Contested Modernities, Decolonial Visions edited by García Romeo and Baca Damiá, National Council of Teachers of English 2019, pp 85–111.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Anzaldúa Gloria E. Light in the Dark/Luz en lo Oscuro: Rewriting Identity, Spirituality, Reality edited by Keating AnaLouise, Duke UP 2015.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Ayash Nancy Bou, Toward Translingual Realities in Composition: (Re)Working Local Language Representations and Practices. UP of Colorado 2019.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Baca Damián, and Villanueva Víctor editors Rhetorics of the Americas: 3114 BCE to 2012 CE. Palgrave 2010.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Baca Isabel, et al. Bordered Writers: Latinx Identities and Literacy Practices at Hispanic-Serving Institutions. State U of New York P 2019.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Baudrillard Jean. “The System of Collecting.” The Cultures of Collection edited by Elsner John and Cardinal Roger, translated by Cardinal Roger, Reaktion Books 1994, pp 7–24.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Bell Derrick. Faces at the Bottom of the Well: The Permanence of Racism. Basic Books 1992.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Blackwell Maylei. ¡Chicana Power! Contested Histories of Feminism in the Chicano Movement. U of Texas P 2011.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Calafell Bernadette Marie. “Pro(re-) claiming Loss: A Performance Pilgrimage in Search of Malintzin Tenépal.” Text and Performance Quarterly, vol. 25, no. 1 2005, pp 43–56.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Camangian Patrick. “Starting with Self: Teaching Autoethnography to Foster Critically Caring Literacies.” Research in the Teaching of English, vol. 45, no. 2 2010, pp 179–204.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Canagarajah A. Suresh. “Autoethnography in the Study of Multilingual Writers.” Writing Studies Research in Practice: Methods and Methodologies edited by Nickoson Lee and Sheridan Mary P., Southern Illinois UP 2012, pp 113–24.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Cedillo Christina V., et al. “Listening to Stories: Practicing Cultural Rhetorics Pedagogy. A Virtual Roundtable.” Constellations: A Cultural Rhetorics Publishing Space 2018, https://constell8cr.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Cedillo-et-al_Listening-to-Stories_Final-PDF.pdf.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Cedillo Christina V., and Bratta Phil. “Relating Our Experiences: The Practice of Positionality Stories in Student-Centered Pedagogy.” College Composition and Communication, 71, no. 2 2019, pp 215–40.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Council of Writing Program Administrators, et al. Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing. Council of Writing Program Administrators / National Council of Teachers of English / National Writing Project 2011, https://wpacouncil.org/aws/CWPA/asset_manager/get_file/350201?ver=7548.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Cushman Ellen, et al. “Decolonizing Projects: Creating Pluriversal Possibilities in Rhetoric.” Rhetoric Review, vol. 38, no. 1 2019, pp 1–22.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Delgado Richard. “Storytelling for Oppositionists and Others: A Plea for Narrative.” Michigan Law Review, vol. 87, no. 8, pp. 2411–41.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Ellis Carolyn. The Ethnographic I: A Methodological Novel about Autoethnography. AltaMira Press 2004.
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Enoch Jessica, and VanHaitsma Pamela. “Archival Literacy: Reading the Rhetoric of Digital Archives in the Undergraduate Classroom.” College Composition and Communication, vol. 67, no. 2 2015, pp 216–42.
    [Google Scholar]
  20. García Romeo, and Cortez José M. “The Trace of a Mark that Scatters: The Anthropoi and the Rhetoric of Decoloniality.” Rhetoric Society Quarterly, vol. 50, no. 2 2020, pp 93–108.
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Gaspar de Alba Alicia. [Un]framing the “Bad Woman”: Sor Juana, Malinche, Coyolxauhqui, and Other Rebels with a Cause. U of Texas P 2014.
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Gonzalez Norma, et al. Funds of Knowledge: Theorising Practices in Households, Communities, and Classrooms. Erlbaum 2005.
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Gonzalez Rita, et al. editors Phantom Sightings: Art after the Chicano Movement, U of California P 2008.
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Grosfoguel Ramón. “The Epistemic Decolonial Turn: Beyond PoliticalEconomy Paradigms.” Cultural Studies, vol. 21, nos. 2-3 2007, pp 219–20.
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Hayden Wendy. “And Gladly Teach: The Archival Turn’s Pedagogical Turn.” College English, vol. 80, no. 2 2017, pp 133–58.
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Hayden Wendy. “‘Gifts’ of the Archives: A Pedagogy for Undergraduate Research.” College Composition and Communication, vol. 66, no. 3 2015, pp 402–26.
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Horner Bruce, et al. “Opinion: Language Difference in Writing: Toward a Translingual Approach.” College English, vol. 73, no. 3 2011, p 303–21.
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Kirsch Gesa E., et al. editors Unsettling Archival Research: Engaging Critical, Communal, and Digital Archives. Southern Illinois UP 2023.
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Kramsch Claire, and Lam Wan Shun Eva. “Textual Identities: The Importance of Being Non-Native.” Non-Native Educators in English Language Teaching edited by Braine George, Erlbaum 1999, pp 57–75.
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Kristensen Randi Gray. “From Things Fall Apart to Freedom Dreams: Black Studies and Cultural Studies in the Composition Classroom.” Enculturation, vol. 6, no. 1 2008, https://enculturation.net/6.1/kristensen.
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Lindquist Julie, and Halbritter Bump. “Documenting and Discovering Learning: Reimagining the Work of the Literacy Narrative.” College Composition and Communication, vol. 70, no. 3 2019, pp 413–45.
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Lyons Scott Richard. “Rhetorical Sovereignty: What Do American Indians Want from Writing?” College Composition and Communication, vol. 51, no. 3 2000, pp 447–68.
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Martinez Aja Y. “Core-Coursing Counterstory: On Master Narrative Histories of Rhetorical Studies Curricula.” Rhetoric Review, vol. 38, no. 4 2019, pp 402–16.
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Martinez Aja Y. Counterstory: The Rhetoric and Writing of Critical Race Theory. National Council of Teachers of English 2020.
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Martinez Danny C. “Imagining a Language of Solidarity for Black and Latinx Youth in English Language Arts Classrooms.” English Education, vol. 49, no. 2 2017, pp 179–96.
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Meadow Mark A. “Merchants and Marvels: Hans Jacob Fugger and the Origins of the Wunderkammer.” Merchants and Marvels: Commerce and the Representation of Nature edited by Findlen Paula and Smith Pamela, Routledge 2002, pp 182–200.
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Mignolo Walter. “Delinking.” Cultural Studies, vol. 21, nos. 2-3 2007, pp 449–514.
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Mignolo Walter. “Epistemic Disobedience and the Decolonial Option.” Transmodernity: Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World, vol. 1, no. 2 2011, pp 44–66.
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Mignolo Walter. “Foreword. On Pluriversality and Multipolarity.” Constructing the Pluriverse: The Geopolitics of Knowledge edited by Reiter Bernd, Duke UP 2018, pp ix–xvi.
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Milian Claudia. “Extremely Latin, XOXO: Notes on LatinX.” Cultural Dynamics, vol. 29, no. 3 2017, pp 121–40.
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Miller Mary Ellen. Art of the Mesoamerica: From Olmec to Aztec. Thames and Hudson 2006.
    [Google Scholar]
  42. Moraga Cherríe. Loving in the War Years: Lo Que Nunca Pasó Por Sus Labios. South End Press 2000.
    [Google Scholar]
  43. Moreno Renee. “‘The Politics of Location’: Text as Opposition.” College Composition and Communication, vol. 54, no. 2 2002, pp 222–42.
    [Google Scholar]
  44. Ndlovu-Gatsheni Sabelo J. Epistemic Freedom in Africa: Deprovincialization and Decolonization. Routledge 2018.
    [Google Scholar]
  45. Powell Malea. “2012 CCCC Chair’s Address: Stories Take Place. A Performance in One Act.” College Composition and Communication, vol. 64, no. 2 2012, pp 383–406.
    [Google Scholar]
  46. Purdy James P. “Three Gifts of Digital Archives.” Journal of Literacy and Technology, vol. 12 2011, pp 24–49.
    [Google Scholar]
  47. Ramirez Loretta. “Archival Quest: Research Writing Pedagogies to Recover Historical Rhetorics that Centralize Latinx Voice and Inquiry.” Composition Studies, vol. 51, no. 1, Spring 2023, pp 91–110.
    [Google Scholar]
  48. Ramirez Loretta. “Unmaking Colonial Fictions: Cherríe Moraga’s Rhetorics of Fragmentation and Semi-ness.” Rhetoric Review, vol. 41, no. 3 2022, pp 168–83.
    [Google Scholar]
  49. Ramirez Loretta. The Wound and the Stitch: A Genealogy of the Female Body from Medieval Iberia to SoCal Chicanx Art. Pennsylvania State UP 2024.
    [Google Scholar]
  50. Rice Felicia, et al., Doc/Undoc: Documentado/Undocumented Ars Shamánica Performática. City Lights Book 2017.
    [Google Scholar]
  51. Rivera Nora K. “Chicanx Murals: Decolonizing Place and (Re)Writing the Terms of Composition.” College Composition and Communication, vol. 72, no. 1 2020, pp 118–49.
    [Google Scholar]
  52. Ruiz Iris D., and Sánchez Raúl editors Decolonizing Rhetoric and Composition Studies: New Latinx Keywords for Theory and Pedagogy. Palgrave Macmillan 2016.
    [Google Scholar]
  53. Shelton Anthony Alan. “Cabinets of Transgression: Renaissance Collections and the New World.” The Cultures of Collecting edited by Elsner John and Cardinal Roger, Harvard UP 1994, pp 177–203.
    [Google Scholar]
  54. Sheridan Mary P. “Making Ethnography Our Own: Why and How Writing Studies Must Redefine Core Research Practices.” Writing Studies Research in Practice: Methods and Methodologies edited by Nickoson Lee and Sheridan Mary P., Southern Illinois UP 2012, pp 73–85.
    [Google Scholar]
  55. Solórzano Daniel G. “Critical Race Theory’s Intellectual Roots: My Email Epistolary with Derrick Bell.” Critical Race Theory in Education Handbook edited by Lynn Marvin and Dixson Adrienne, Routledge 2013, pp 48–68.
    [Google Scholar]
  56. Tuck Eve, and Yang K. Wayne. “Decolonization Is Not a Metaphor.” Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education and Society, vol. 1, no. 1 2012, pp 1–40.
    [Google Scholar]
  57. VanHaitsma Pamela. “New Pedagogical Engagements with Archives: Student Inquiry and Composing in Digital Spaces.” College English, vol. 78, no. 1 2015, pp 34–55.
    [Google Scholar]
  58. Vélez-Ibáñez Carlos, and Greenberg James. “Formation and Transformation of Funds of Knowledge.” Anthropology and Education Quarterly, vol. 23, no. 4 1993, pp 313–35.
    [Google Scholar]
  59. Whitinui Paul. “Indigenous Autoethnography: Exploring, Engaging, and Experiencing ‘Self’ as a Native Method of Inquiry.” Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, vol. 43, no. 4 2014, pp 456–87.
    [Google Scholar]
  60. Yancey Kathleen Blake. “Portfolios, Learning, and Agency: Promises, Perceptions, Possibilities.” JAC, vol. 31, no. 3/4 2011, pp 717–36.
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.58680/ccc2024753483
Loading
  • Article Type: Research Article
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error