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2018
Volume 74, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 0010-096X
  • E-ISSN: 1939-9006

Abstract

This essay examines two narratives for US higher education—the tradition of access and the current moment of globalized expansion—to understand how policies about access and language do not inherently uphold practices of equity. I also discuss how writing specialists can intervene in the explicit and implicit practice of these policies.

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/content/journals/10.58680/ccc202232119
2022-09-01
2024-06-17
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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