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2018
Volume 73, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0010-096X
  • E-ISSN: 1939-9006
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Abstract

Drawing on Kenyan hip-hop, this article: (1) illustrates the decolonial possibilities of translingualism, including paths to linguistic decolonization; (2) showcases how translingualism can facilitate the recovery of Indigenous hybrid languaging practices; (3) highlights how global Western capitalism threatens translingualism’s decolonial potential; and (4) offers further implications for rhetoric and writing scholars and teachers.

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/content/journals/10.58680/ccc202231872
2022-02-01
2024-06-18
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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