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2018
Volume 72, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0010-096X
  • E-ISSN: 1939-9006

Abstract

When first admitted to Oberlin College, women were expected to attend their rhetoric courses in silence. Not content with an education that did not prepare them for public speaking, some women students collaborated to educate themselves. Their history uncovers feminist and antiracist disruptions to composition and rhetoric that have much to teach present-day educators.

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2021-02-01
2024-04-13
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