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2018
Volume 70, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0010-096X
  • E-ISSN: 1939-9006

Abstract

Through an ecological and autoethnographic analysis of a repository of diachronically archived texts written over a period of six years in multiple cultural, geographical, and disciplinary contexts, the author unfolds his materialized experiences of coming to terms with, embracing, and composing with rhetorical differences as spatiotemporal relationality and affordances.

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/content/journals/10.58680/ccc201929988
2019-02-01
2024-02-27
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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