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2018
Volume 69, Issue 4
  • ISSN: 0010-096X
  • E-ISSN: 1939-9006

Abstract

Empirical research on composing processes is virtually absent in our field. What do contemporary writers actually when they compose? I argue that we need a return to research on composing processes, as writers are every day weaving together the social and cognitive through writing. One writer’s composing process think-aloud suggests how some writers today weave together cognitive and cultural processes of meaning making in ways unimagined at the time of the last composing process research.

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/content/journals/10.58680/ccc201829692
2018-06-01
2024-03-03
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